13 janv. 2013

L' attention sélective chez la libellule

In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
The discovery, to be published online today in the journal Current Biology, is the first evidence that an invertebrate animal has brain cells for selective attention, which has so far only been demonstrated in primates. Dr Steven Wiederman and Associate Professor David O'Carroll from the University of Adelaide's Centre for Neuroscience Research have been studying insect vision for many years. Using a tiny glass probe with a tip that is only 60 nanometers wide - 1500 times smaller than the width of a human hair - the researchers have discovered neuron activity in the dragonfly's brain that enables this selective attention. They found that when presented with more than one visual target, the dragonfly brain cell 'locks on' to one target and behaves as if the other targets don't exist.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
The discovery, to be published online today in the journal Current Biology, is the first evidence that an invertebrate animal has brain cells for selective attention, which has so far only been demonstrated in primates. Dr Steven Wiederman and Associate Professor David O'Carroll from the University of Adelaide's Centre for Neuroscience Research have been studying insect vision for many years. Using a tiny glass probe with a tip that is only 60 nanometers wide - 1500 times smaller than the width of a human hair - the researchers have discovered neuron activity in the dragonfly's brain that enables this selective attention. They found that when presented with more than one visual target, the dragonfly brain cell 'locks on' to one target and behaves as if the other targets don't exist.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCpf
Odonata

In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
Selective attention in dragonflies
In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understantding of Nature and aplications for robot vision, researchers at the Univerity of Adelaïde have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of hight level thought processes when it hunts.
To read more, follow the link HERE.

In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision,

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
Une découverte importante pour la science cognitive vient d'être réalisée dans le domaine de notre compréhension de la nature et de ses applications en matière de vision des robots.

Des chercheurs à l'Université d'Adelaide viennent de trouver la preuve que la libellule est capable d'avoir un processus de pensée bien plus élevé qu'on ne le pensait quand elle chasse une proie.
Elle possède donc des cellules cérébrales pour une attention sélective, ce qui n'a été
démontré jusqu'ici que chez les primates.
 
 

 
Dr Steven Wiederman et son associé le  Professeur David O'Carroll (de l'Université du Centre d'Adelaide de la Recherche de Neuroscience) ont étudié la vision des insectes depuis de nombreuses années.

En utilisant une sonde minuscule en verre, dont le bout fait seulement 60 nanomètres de diamètre (1500 fois plus petit que la largeur de cheveux humains), les chercheurs ont découvert une activité neuronale dans le cerveau de la libellule qui lui permet cette attention sélective.
Ils se sont aperçu que la cellule de son cerveau se fixe alors sur une seule cible et elle se comporte comme si les autres cibles n'existaient pas.





Voir la vidéo ci-après qui en montre une en train de chercher une proie et se focaliser dessus une fois repérée, ignorant toutes les autres.
On la voit même réaligner son corps vers sa cible.
Elles sont capables d'en choisir une seule, même dans un essaim entier d'insectes, et de se tenir à celle-ci très précisément.
This is a video in the field showing a dragonfly on the hunt for prey -- shown at normal speed and then in slow motion. The dragonfly hovers while it searches for prey, moving its head and then repositioning its body, ready to pursue a target. When a target is identified (in this case a small fly), the dragonfly locks on and ignores all other potential targets. It swoops up and catches its prey. Credit: Associate Professor David O'Carroll, University of Adelaide. "Selective attention is fundamental to humans' ability to select and respond to one sensory stimulus in the presence of distractions," Dr Wiederman says. "Imagine a tennis player having to pick out a small ball from the crowd when it's traveling at almost 200kms an hour - you need selective attention in order to hit that ball back into play. "Precisely how this works in biological brains remains poorly understood, and this has been a hot topic in neuroscience in recent years," he says. "The dragonfly hunts for other insects, and these might be part of a swarm - they're all tiny moving objects. Once the dragonfly has selected a target, its neuron activity filters out all other potential prey. The dragonfly then swoops in on its prey - they get it right 97% of the time." Associate Professor O'Carroll says this brain activity makes the dragonfly a more efficient and effective predator. "What's exciting for us is that this is the first direct demonstration of something akin to selective attention in humans shown at the single neuron level in an invertebrate," Associate Professor O'Carroll says. "Recent studies reveal similar mechanisms at work in the primate brain, but you might expect it there. We weren't expecting to find something so sophisticated in lowly insects from a group that's been around for 325 million years. "We believe our work will appeal to neuroscientists and engineers alike. For example, it could be used as a model system for robotic vision. Because the insect brain is simple and accessible, future work may allow us to fully understand the underlying network of neurons and copy it into intelligent robots," he says. Journal reference: Current Biology search and more info website Provided by University of Adelaide

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp

Ce qui semble évident pour les mammifères l'est beaucoup moins chez les invertébrés et les chercheurs ont été très surpris de découvrir ce phénomène chez des insectes qui vivent sur la planète depuis 325 millions d'années!
 La fonctionalité très succincte des neurones de libellule permettant une compréhension simplifiée elle pourra être facilement copiée pour l'ingénierie de la robotique.

The video
In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
"What's exciting for us is that this is the first direct demonstration of something akin to selective attention in humans shown at the single neuron level in an invertebrate," Associate Professor O'Carroll says. "Recent studies reveal similar mechanisms at work in the primate brain, but you might expect it there. We weren't expecting to find something so sophisticated in lowly insects from a group that's been around for 325 million years. "We believe our work will appeal to neuroscientists and engineers alike. For example, it could be used as a model system for robotic vision. Because the insect brain is simple and accessible, future work may allow us to fully understand the underlying network of neurons and copy it into intelligent robots," he says.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
This is a video in the field showing a dragonfly on the hunt for prey -- shown at normal speed and then in slow motion. The dragonfly hovers while it searches for prey, moving its head and then repositioning its body, ready to pursue a target. When a target is identified (in this case a small fly), the dragonfly locks on and ignores all other potential targets. It swoops up and catches its prey. Credit: Associate Professor David O'Carroll, University of Adelaide. "Selective attention is fundamental to humans' ability to select and respond to one sensory stimulus in the presence of distractions," Dr Wiederman says. "Imagine a tennis player having to pick out a small ball from the crowd when it's traveling at almost 200kms an hour - you need selective attention in order to hit that ball back into play. "Precisely how this works in biological brains remains poorly understood, and this has been a hot topic in neuroscience in recent years," he says. "The dragonfly hunts for other insects, and these might be part of a swarm - they're all tiny moving objects. Once the dragonfly has selected a target, its neuron activity filters out all other potential prey. The dragonfly then swoops in on its prey - they get it right 97% of the time." Associate Professor O'Carroll says this brain activity makes the dragonfly a more efficient and effective predator. "What's exciting for us is that this is the first direct demonstration of something akin to selective attention in humans shown at the single neuron level in an invertebrate," Associate Professor O'Carroll says. "Recent studies reveal similar mechanisms at work in the primate brain, but you might expect it there. We weren't expecting to find something so sophisticated in lowly insects from a group that's been around for 325 million years. "We believe our work will appeal to neuroscientists and engineers alike. For example, it could be used as a model system for robotic vision. Because the insect brain is simple and accessible, future work may allow us to fully understand the underlying network of neurons and copy it into intelligent robots," he says. Journal reference: Current Biology search and more info website Provided by University of Adelaide

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
Using a tiny glass probe with a tip that is only 60 nanometers wide - 1500 times smaller than the width of a human hair - the researchers have discovered neuron activity in the dragonfly's brain that enables this selective attention. They found that when presented with more than one visual target, the dragonfly brain cell 'locks on' to one target and behaves as if the other targets don't exist.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey. Ads by Google Notary Publics - All Kinds Of Notary Services Available. Contact Us Today! - www.savillenotaries.com The discovery, to be published online today in the journal Current Biology, is the first evidence that an invertebrate animal has brain cells for selective attention, which has so far only been demonstrated in primates. Dr Steven Wiederman and Associate Professor David O'Carroll from the University of Adelaide's Centre for Neuroscience Research have been studying insect vision for many years. Using a tiny glass probe with a tip that is only 60 nanometers wide - 1500 times smaller than the width of a human hair - the researchers have discovered neuron activity in the dragonfly's brain that enables this selective attention. They found that when presented with more than one visual target, the dragonfly brain cell 'locks on' to one target and behaves as if the other targets don't exist.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey. Ads by Google Notary Publics - All Kinds Of Notary Services Available. Contact Us Today! - www.savillenotaries.com The discovery, to be published online today in the journal Current Biology, is the first evidence that an invertebrate animal has brain cells for selective attention, which has so far only been demonstrated in primates. Dr Steven Wiederman and Associate Professor David O'Carroll from the University of Adelaide's Centre for Neuroscience Research have been studying insect vision for many years. Using a tiny glass probe with a tip that is only 60 nanometers wide - 1500 times smaller than the width of a human hair - the researchers have discovered neuron activity in the dragonfly's brain that enables this selective attention. They found that when presented with more than one visual target, the dragonfly brain cell 'locks on' to one target and behaves as if the other targets don't exist.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey. Ads by Google Notary Publics - All Kinds Of Notary Services Available. Contact Us Today! - www.savillenotaries.com The discovery, to be published online today in the journal Current Biology, is the first evidence that an invertebrate animal has brain cells for selective attention, which has so far only been demonstrated in primates. Dr Steven Wiederman and Associate Professor David O'Carroll from the University of Adelaide's Centre for Neuroscience Research have been studying insect vision for many years. Using a tiny glass probe with a tip that is only 60 nanometers wide - 1500 times smaller than the width of a human hair - the researchers have discovered neuron activity in the dragonfly's brain that enables this selective attention. They found that when presented with more than one visual target, the dragonfly brain cell 'locks on' to one target and behaves as if the other targets don't exist.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey. Ads by Google Notary Publics - All Kinds Of Notary Services Available. Contact Us Today! - www.savillenotaries.com The discovery, to be published online today in the journal Current Biology, is the first evidence that an invertebrate animal has brain cells for selective attention, which has so far only been demonstrated in primates. Dr Steven Wiederman and Associate Professor David O'Carroll from the University of Adelaide's Centre for Neuroscience Research have been studying insect vision for many years. Using a tiny glass probe with a tip that is only 60 nanometers wide - 1500 times smaller than the width of a human hair - the researchers have discovered neuron activity in the dragonfly's brain that enables this selective attention. They found that when presented with more than one visual target, the dragonfly brain cell 'locks on' to one target and behaves as if the other targets don't exist.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey. Ads by Google Notary Publics - All Kinds Of Notary Services Available. Contact Us Today! - www.savillenotaries.com The discovery, to be published online today in the journal Current Biology, is the first evidence that an invertebrate animal has brain cells for selective attention, which has so far only been demonstrated in primates. Dr Steven Wiederman and Associate Professor David O'Carroll from the University of Adelaide's Centre for Neuroscience Research have been studying insect vision for many years. Using a tiny glass probe with a tip that is only 60 nanometers wide - 1500 times smaller than the width of a human hair - the researchers have discovered neuron activity in the dragonfly's brain that enables this selective attention. They found that when presented with more than one visual target, the dragonfly brain cell 'locks on' to one target and behaves as if the other targets don't exist.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp
In a discovery that may prove important for cognitive science, our understanding of nature and applications for robot vision, researchers at the University of Adelaide have found evidence that the dragonfly is capable of higher-level thought processes when hunting its prey. Ads by Google Notary Publics - All Kinds Of Notary Services Available. Contact Us Today! - www.savillenotaries.com The discovery, to be published online today in the journal Current Biology, is the first evidence that an invertebrate animal has brain cells for selective attention, which has so far only been demonstrated in primates. Dr Steven Wiederman and Associate Professor David O'Carroll from the University of Adelaide's Centre for Neuroscience Research have been studying insect vision for many years. Using a tiny glass probe with a tip that is only 60 nanometers wide - 1500 times smaller than the width of a human hair - the researchers have discovered neuron activity in the dragonfly's brain that enables this selective attention. They found that when presented with more than one visual target, the dragonfly brain cell 'locks on' to one target and behaves as if the other targets don't exist.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-12-dragonflies-human-like-attention.html#jCp

32 commentaires :

Nokomis a dit…

Un article intéressant, tout comme la vidéo d'ailleurs, mais tes photos ! waouffffff !
Magnifique, et la première, je fonds !
Merci Noushka.
Bises et bonne fin de journée

Nathalie Santa Maria a dit…

L'homme a, depuis son existence, copié la nature pour évoluer, nous n'avons rien d’inné, elle nous apprend tout !
Même les plus gros bonnets sont rikiki :)
Bises Noushka et bonne soirée

Joke (Jokes Camera) a dit…

This is very intersting, Noushka. It is almost like the face recognition/detection on my camera. Nature amazes me time after time. Your pictures are splendid. I love those flying dragonflies. Your first picture is my favorite. The color of the dragonfly is so beautiful on that photo. By the way, thanks for your answer about that hide. I have made one in my living room today to photograph the birds in the garden. It really helps, but I am not satisfied with my pictures. I need much more practise, before I can publish one. Have a nice evening. Greetings, Joke

Willy a dit…

Hi Noushka,
I have also read this article in a Dutch newspaper. Very interesting!
By the way....your photos are also very interesting and marvelous!

Thanks for sharing!

Roger Uranie a dit…

Eh bé !!! dis-moi....tu en connais des trucs sur les moeurs des belles dames :-)) Un message passionnant qui nous en dit long sur la perfection des êtres vivants fussent-ils de simples odonates.
Côté images elles sont exemplaires, c'est comme d'habitude parfait mais ça ne m'étonne plus ;-)

Tinie a dit…

Splendeur des photos de libellules en vol, c'est assez difficile à obtenir.
C'est vous, bien fait Noushka.


Groetjes Tinie

Chamoiselle a dit…

Waou les images! J y connais rien en libellule mais alors les images chui sur le c...;-)

Food, Fun and Life in the Charente a dit…

Guess you took these photos when the weather was better than it is at the moment :) Great photos. Diane xx

Tammy a dit…

Interesting article, Noushka! That might explain why some dragonflies act like I am not there when I get close to photograph them. Your photos are superb! The in-flight shots are difficult, but you have mastered them! Wishing you a wonderful week!

nic.b van es a dit…

De belles images, des photos et une déclaration très intéressante.

Antonio Pesk@ a dit…

Vaya congelación de vuelo,son difíciles de afotar en vuelo las libélulas.
Un saludo amigo
.

Ana Mínguez Corella a dit…

fantásticas amiga. la has inmortalizado y de que manera.. Cheers!!!..

DIMI a dit…

Very beautiful photos Noushka!!Great shots!!Wishing you a lovely week!!
Dimi..

Gaya Nature a dit…

Bonsoir Noushka,

Article très intéressant accompagné de superbes photos!

Bises et bonne soirée!

Fabrice a dit…

De très belles prises de vue comme tu en as le secret.
Cela faisait un moment que je n'étais pas venu visiter ton blog.
Je voulais te dire que j'avais beaucoup de difficultés à ouvrir et laisser un commentaire.
En attendant j'espère que ce nouveau millésime nous apportera autant de satisfaction dans nos observations.
Au plaisir
@+ Fab

Fundy Blue a dit…

You have managed to capture the beauty of the dragonfly's gossamer wings, Noushka! Well done! The information in the article was very interesting. I keep saying that there is far more going on in animal brains than we realize. I hope you are having a nice weekend.

Olinda Melo a dit…


Magnífica informação. Quem havia de dizer, a pequena e frágil libélula tão nossa semelhante.

As suas fotos são lindas, com uma precisão impressionante.

Bj

Olinda

Lucie a dit…

On en apprend toujours un peu plus sur ce petit monde.Les yeux des libellules participent à ce dispositif: leur vision leur permet de voir à 360° et sur 15m, et elles peuvent analyser les mouvements de leur proie 175fois par seconde, contre 18 fois par seconde pour l'homme.Quelle différence n'est-ce pas?

Digi-Irma a dit…

Great photos of the flying dragonflies Noushka.
Also very instructive explanation, compliments.
Greetings Irma

Noushka a dit…

Oui Lucie, je le sais!
Mais l'attention sélective c'est nouvelle observation inédite chez les invertébrés!

Noushka a dit…

Thnkas fundy, that's absolutely true!
We still know close to nothing about Life! ;-)

chatou11 a dit…

Incroyable Noushka et passionnant, tes photos sont sublimes
belle journée avec mille bisous
il neige sur le sud
chatou

kryg77 a dit…

Très intéressant ton commentaire, je viens d'un apprendre un peu plu sur cet insecte...Merci.

Daisy a dit…

Nous avons beaucoup à apprendre des animaux et, dans ce cas, d'un insecte qui a tout pour nous séduire sur de merveilleuses photos !

Noushka a dit…

Un grand merci Daisy!

Patrick a dit…

Tes photos sont splendides et l'info extrêmement intéressante. Je n'ai évidemment pas le matériel de ces scientifiques, mais sans imaginer que les Anax étaient capables de fixer une cible parmi de nombreuses autres, j'ai cependant constaté qu'il y avait dans leur vol, une certaine "logique" (pour ne pas dire réflexion).
As-tu toujours des soucis pour placer des commentaires sur mon blog ?
Bises et bonne soirée
Patrick

Rosemary a dit…

Eeeeek! Your first dragonfly shot has taken my breath away. It is beyond perfect!

Patrycja Photography a dit…

Interesting post. I really like it.
Super blog. Yours. ^ ^

Have a nice day. ;)
+ Welcome to my blog.
If you want to put it in your followers.

Laval Roy a dit…

Comment ne pas s'émerveiller devant de telles photos ? En Amérique, nous réussissons à prendre des photos de colibris en imaginant des stratagèmes quelques fois très sophistiqués comme l'utilisation de six flash qui se déclenchent simultanément afin d'éliminer les ombres et d'arrêter le mouvement des ailes qui exécutent 80 battements à la seconde. Mais toi, comment as-tu fait ? Peut-être étais-tu la proie que la libellule ciblait ? Secret de photographe, d'une grande photographe ? Bravo.

advanduren a dit…

Very cleverly photographed these flying dragonflies Noushka I know how difficult that is. Very well done.

Best regards,
Ad

Helma a dit…

Comment gérez-vous ces belles libellules si joliment et voler en vue et capturer trop. Cela a vraiment profiter :-))))

Maria a dit…

They are actually flying, amazing!!!

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